More Bit Geek Stuff

Many thanks, everyone who commented on the French Link post — I am generally and genuinely interested in equestrian terminology and always find answers to a question about term usage illuminating.

Along these same lines, I could again ask questions about what you call certain types of bits, so I will. I will leave these questions very open-ended. (Keep in mind I am not asking what each bit is for, just what you’d call it. I am not trying to open the leverage can of worms.)

Fulmer or full cheek?

Elevator or gag?

See how open-ended that is?

I have pretty specific pictures in my mind of the difference between a fulmer and a full cheek, but I have seen either called both.

Elevator or gag … that’s more complicated! The bit that first comes to mind when I hear “gag” is a Cheltenham gag, but that is not the only type of gag bit out there–many bits have a gag action and aren’t what I or anyone else would call a Cheltenham gag.

When I hear “elevator” I picture those 3- or 4-ring bits that people call elevator, Dutch gag, bubble bit, or Pessoa bit. I know y’all know what I’m talking about–what do you call them? (Let’s skip talking about how and how many reins you use with these bits.)

I think this is what some people might refer to as a “true” elevator?

One final question– is it possible to use fulmer/bit loops on a Nelson gag? Like, how would that work? I can’t picture it because of how gag cheeks work, so I am thinking emphatically no.

See what I’m saying?

This post is pretty slanted toward the English disciplines (especially the over fences ones) as I am not at all familiar with bit names for Western, Gaited/Park, or Driving. I welcome any answers along those lines, too!

 

EGO 7 Orion Field Boot Review Update

Back in October/November-ish, I ordered EGO 7 Orion Field Boots from Germany. This means I spent $340 USD for boots that retail at $499 here (many tack shops have them in stock now).

And you know what? I’d buy these boots again at $499 in a heartbeat. 10 months in to wearing these boots fairly frequently, they have worn beautifully.

So I’ll break this down for you piece by piece based on my tall boot comparison chart.

FIT

The EGO 7 fit is S L I M. If your measurements are toward the larger end of a range in the size chart, I suggest sizing up. I fell about in the middle of the range for my calf size and the fit is very, very snug. I am thinking I might need a second pair for winter riding with a larger calf size if I want boots that will fit over thicker breeches and socks. They fit me well over thinner breeches and socks. The tall height worked out perfectly for me, as did the foot size 39. The break in time was about a week, and not once did I get a blister anywhere.

FUNCTION

The Orions have so many useful, purposeful features. Most importantly, they work well for riding. But no detail was left unattended in the design of these boots. There is a lot to cover here!

The hardware is high quality and durable–EGO 7s have the same zippers as Tucci boots so you know you can count on them to last a while.

The inner calf panel interested me, although I wasn’t quite sure what to think about it initially. Turns out, it’s about as grippy as regular (good) leather but it doesn’t abrade my saddle’s flaps. And considering I just got a new-to-me Devoucoux, I am glad the panels are there.

The stretch panel has a slight sheen to it, but it is so subtle that I don’t find it noticeably distracting. The stretch panel also seems extremely durable and not super stretchy. Like you know how the elastic gussets in paddock boots get all wavy and useless after a lot of wear? This will not be happening to the EGO 7 stretch panel–it’s a different type of material that has some stretch, just enough for a little bit more of a custom-looking fit.

The spur rests look like none I have ever seen and give the option of three or four different places to wear your spur. Eli appreciates I can wear my spur quite low with these boots without it slipping down too far.

As far as features that ensure a good fit, the elastic zipper guards, padded heel guards, and thin insoles all add to the comfort of these boots. Honestly, I am surprised more boot makers don’t have the elastic zipper guards–it makes them so much easier to snap over the zipper pull keepers at the top of tall boots.

Last, these boots have the right type of grippy outsoles for staying put on the stirrup iron treads. The soles in general are on the harder side, which I now know is a necessity for me after my experience with Parlanti soles. I don’t really want a sneaker feel for my tall boots.

STYLE

I think in my previous look at these boots back in November, I may have said I probably wouldn’t show in them … well, I did show in them. Polished up, these are perfect for all 3 rings. There is also a dress boot version for all y’all DQs. The toe cap, slim ankles, slightly tapered, rounded toe, softly-contoured Spanish top, and unique spur rests give these boots a stylish but contemporary look that works for showing or schooling.

COST

These boots are without a doubt worth the $499 that most people in America would be paying for them — I know most people prefer to try on boots before buying them rather than ordering from overseas and hoping for the best. But if you are willing to risk it, the Euro hasn’t bounced back all the way yet, so you may save a bit if you choose to order from Germany like I did. Even at $499, I think they are a budget-friendly tall boot and a well-fitted option when stacked up against more expensive custom brands.

Without reservations, I highly recommend these boots. They are already holding up much, much better than many other tall boots that I have tried. Added bonus–they should be out in brown soon!

 

French Link

I have a semantic question for you: what kind of bit do you call a French link?

A French link, to me, denotes a very specific type of double-joint of a bit, like the above one. But I frequently see people describing almost any double-jointed bit as a French link, especially the double-jointed Herm Sprenger bits.

I don’t call this a French link. Anyway, it’s German.

So, to you, what’s a French link?

Organize

trot from patentlybay on Vimeo.

The regular Saturday lesson was much less chaotic than the Saturday before. And also less work, primarily because of the heat. Even at 10am, I think it was in the 90s. Everything felt very melty in general.

We worked on the primary theme of staying organized on the other side of the fence. Eli and I often land in a bit of a heap and it takes me a few strides to recover. Which is not desirable by any stretch. We trotted a few warm up fences first, my trainer emphasizing that I need to land riding.

take 1 from patentlybay on Vimeo.

take 2 from patentlybay on Vimeo.

We wound up just sticking with trotting in and cantering out of some lines and after a few rounds of that I personally had had enough of the heat, so undoubtedly Eli had, too. We don’t have anything planned for August, but I would still like Eli to stay in condition for a few things we have on the calendar for September. Maybe this coming Saturday we can do a little more!

Saddle Shopping

Ask anyone — saddle shopping sucks. Especially if you are on any kind of budget other than “new, custom, & French.”

Well, it only kind of sucks. Actually, it’s not that bad. I know what I want and what I am willing to spend and I think I mostly have reasonable expectations for my budget. And I own a fairly average-sized and -shaped TB, which helps.

Requirements, listed in order of importance:
French — namely Bruno Delgrange or Devoucoux. I will not and did not look at other brands.
Sound tree.
Narrow twist.
Condition considered regardless of age.
Must be around the cost of what my old saddle sells for.
17″-17.5″ seat.
Slightly forward flap.
Padded flap.
No repairs necessary.
Available for trial.

You see, Eli and I have both been working hard on our hunter chunk physique, and we would like something that accommodates us a little better than the 17″ straight flap Bruno Delgrange PJ (I think it’s a PJ Lite because it doesn’t have blocks). I barely fit in that saddle anymore–PJs run small. As much as I love it, I also like my stirrups about a hole shorter than they should be, so I need a more forward flap, really. Eli would like panels with a bit more surface area, a wider gullet, and a deeper channel. We need a different saddle.

Like this one.

All these things narrow my casual internet saddle browsing considerably. I know what fits me. I have sat in many brands — Devoucoux and Delgrange have models that work the best for me. I am a good judge of what will most likely fit Eli, and I have professionals around me who can help me decide what’s right about fit for me and my horse. And I know how much I can spend. (I most definitely was not looking at 2016 full buffalo stuff. Well, maybe looking … but that’s it.)

Eli was convinced I was standing in the wrong spot to take a cute picture of him, so he tried to help me out.

Initially, I wanted to make sure there was still a market around me for the Delgrange PJ. I contacted three trainers, and all had interest. A potential buyer was in my saddle the next day. The following day, I rode in the first saddle I had taken on trial. I had a trainer (Eli’s massage therapist!) help me check the fit. Later that day, I got a text from my trainer saying the rider who tried it Saturday would like to buy my PJ. She also wanted my stirrup irons but she’d have to pry my MDCs from my cold dead hand and they were already on my trial saddle, so I think I just sold a new pair of MDC S Flex irons …

Monday, I rode in the trial saddle again. Eli went as well as he usually does, nothing unusual about the ride (we still can’t handle canter poles). The saddle felt very stable and well-balanced while on him. After the ride, I poked around on his back to see if he had any soreness. I thought I might have found a spot just behind his withers on the left, but turns out he was just really itchy there. What would he do if I ever pared my nails short? After Monday’s ride, I felt pretty good about keeping the saddle. I found no reason not to keep it.

I emailed Leah at Redwood Tack on Tuesday to tell her I’d be keeping the saddle. If any of you are in the market for a new-to-you used saddle, I HIGHLY recommend Redwood Tack. I wasn’t necessarily expecting to buy the first saddle I took on trial, because when does that happen? I think knowing what I was willing to try out and pay for made a huge difference in the ease of my search, and my search was not hurried at all–I look at used saddles frequently, even if I am not in the market, just to see what’s out there. Having realistic expectations about what you want and what you can spend helps, too.

So welcome to my tack locker, Little Dev.